Food Addiction

Wiss Podcasts Summer 2020

Wiss Podcasts Summer 2020

Who doesn’t love a good podcast? David Wiss has been very fortunate to be invited as a guest on many podcasts over the years! Many people have told him that they have listened to various shows and then reached out to begin a discussion. Podcasts are a great way to meet new colleagues and make new friends! Therefore, these three podcasts are all very rewarding.

This first one is with Erin Kenney MS RDN from Nutrition Rewired who is a rising star in the dietitian field! In this episode they discuss the link between early life adversity and disordered eating over the lifespan, as well as some other hot topics such as sugar addiction and gut health!

57:52

This next podcast is with Smitty who is a personal trainer and health coach specializing in working with people in recovery. Smitty is the founder of Navigate Health & Fitness. In this episode they cover various topics related to the role of nutrition and exercise in mental health and substance use disorder recovery. The best part is when they talk about body image, particularly as it relates to men.

47:04

This final podcast is a real delight! Tanya Stricek is a health coach who specializes in nutrition and eating behavior. In this episode Tanya shared her personal journey and David interjects with some science and diagnostic considerations to accompany her case study. This conversation is seamless and Tanya summarizes key points on the podcast link below.

37:40
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Binge Eating Recording

David Wiss MS RDN founder of Nutrition in Recovery discusses three different theories to explain why people binge eat: 1) emotional eating 2) dietary restraint and 3) food addiction. He discusses their areas of convergence and divergence and shares his experience as a clinician and researcher.

Struggle with binge eating? Reach out. We can help.

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Virtual Conference Friday July 31, 2020

Conference Presentation: “The Biological Embedding of Adversity”

How Does Trauma Impact Food and Body?

The biological embedding of adversity is a fascinating area of research! This presentation is from the Los Angeles District of California Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics annual conference.

David Wiss MS RDN discusses how early life adversity impacts human biology. This presentation describes how social factors can get “under the skin” and alter neurobiology. Mr. Wiss discusses potential consequences such as sexual abuse and known links to eating behavior.

Do you have questions about biological embedding? Are you curious to learn more about the link between sexual abuse and eating disorders? Don’t hesitate to reach out!

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The Basics of Dopamine

David Wiss MS RDN walks you through the most important concepts related to the dopamine system including wanting vs. liking and reward expectancy. He also shares some personal stuff! Understanding neuroscience is the key to understanding human behavior.

27:26

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David Wiss Podcast Interviews 2020

Who doesn’t love a rich podcast interview about behavioral health nutrition? Below is a list of David Wiss podcast interviews from this year. They are all different but most touch on David’s passion for using nutrition in the treatment of substance use disorders. Some of the interviews are more focused on eating disorders and others are more focused on mental health in general. Check them all out!

Getting Better with Adam w/ Adam Silberstein, PsyD 

Treatment Harmony- A Closer Look at How to Help with Disordered Eating and Addiction (52:06)

In this podcast we discuss:

  • Co-occurring eating and substance use disorder 
  • Food and body issues among men 
  • Discernment regarding different treatment approaches for eating disorder 

Think Yourself Healthy w/ Heather Deranja, MA, RDN, LDN, CPT 

Nutrition in Recovery: How Food and Sugar Addiction Impacts Gut Health and Mental Wellness (48:11)

In this podcast we discuss:

  • Nutrition for substance use disorder: history and where it is headed
  • Food addiction: controversies and implications for public health
  • Sugar addiction: how it affects gut health and mental wellness 

Cope Like a Pro w/ Ilona Varo, LMFT 

A Closer Look at Nutrition and Mental Health (40:22)

In this podcast we discuss:

  • The life course impact of adverse childhood experiences
  • Behavioral health disorders related to nutrition
  • Pathways related to the gut-brain axis 

Dietitian Rehab w/ Doug Cook, MHSc, RDN

Nutrition in Recovery (55:23)

In this podcast we discuss:

  • Broad concept of nutrition for mental health
  • Nutrition education for substance use disorder 
  • The current climate of eating disorder treatment

More David Wiss podcast interviews coming soon!

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More than Meets the Eye: Linking Nutrition & Behavioral Health

Today is Saturday March 28, 2020. The world is in quarantine due to COVID-19 and many are in a behavioral health crisis. I am not depressed about it although certainly concerned for the welfare of my fellows, particularly those in recovery. I have been conducting Zoom and FaceTime sessions with people all over the world and doing what I can to be helpful. I do have more time to work on manuscripts and other academic projects. Tonight I will be coding up some variables for a data analysis.

Last night I had the idea to share my latest presentation with my newsletter followers. So I spent an hour recording my latest presentation “More than Meets the Eye: Linking Nutrition & Behavioral Health.” I hope you enjoy!

The presentation discusses: Traumaadversitynutritioneating disorders, substance use disorders, opioid crisis, food addiction, neurosciencegut-brain axismicrobiome, recovery, treatment and so much more! Nutrition for behavioral health is the future!

1:01:55
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NUTRITION IN RECOVERY CURRICULUM

Nutrition in Recovery Group Curriculum is now Available! 

Nutrition in Recovery Curriculum

In 2012, I ran my first weekly nutrition group at a residential drug and alcohol treatment center in Los Angeles where I taught people about the link between nutrition and behavioral health.  We did not have a TV, so I put together various handouts as reading material for group discussions, based on information that I learned through my own treatment in 2005 & 2006. I’ll never forget the excitement of my first year running Nutrition in Recovery groups and building out the curriculum, and becoming a specialist working with this unique population. The experience was magical – I’ve enjoyed being contacted over the years and people sharing memories of that first nutrition group; someone recently told me that my trip with them to the grocery store while they were in treatment changed their life, and they are now sober working as a chef. This is in part due to the Nutrition in Recovery curriculum.

Nutrition in Recovery took off quickly and by 2013, I was running groups at several different treatment centers, conducting individual counseling and occasionally leading hands-on nutrition workshops. I took on dietetic interns and built out a legendary team of dietitians. We have run groups both locally in Southern California as well as internationally and have hosted various forms of staff training. To date we have contracted with over 30 treatment centers, including facilities that treat eating disorders as well as general mental health. During these years, I have refined the Nutrition in Recovery curriculum based on feedback from attendees as well as the facilitators, and of course the rapidly changing nutrition landscape. 

I have always tried to be available to help, but have never shared any curriculum, until now. The legendary Nutrition in Recovery curriculum is available to you. The content is designed to be delivered by a registered dietitian but can be done by someone who has a proficient background in nutrition and is attuned to recovery culture. Many of the slides have notes under them to help guide you through it all. If you or anyone you know is interested in conducting research using the curriculum, let’s talk.

The Nutrition in Recovery curriculum consists of 26 weeks (that’s 6 months!) of educational presentations, handouts, videos, games, activities, and discussion topics, all of which build upon the previous weeks, but can also be used in any order. Some groups include homework, recipes to keep, and are all designed to stimulate excellent discussion. There is no nutritional agenda embedded into the curriculum, it is flexible to a wide range of approaches. It is also eating disorder informed and friendly, and the best part about it is that you will get the actual PowerPoint and Word docs whenever available, so you can customize the curriculum as you see fit! This will make working at a treatment center manageable, and fun!

  • Week 1: The Basics
  • Week 2: The Nutrition in Recovery Method 
  • Week 3: Fiber the Missing Nutrient
  • Week 4: Incorporating More Fiber
  • Week 5: Budgeting Food During Recovery
  • Week 6: Smoothie Workshop 
  • Week 7: Sugar, Salt, Fat
  • Week 8: Let’s Talk Breakfast
  • Week 9: Substance Substitution 
  • Week 10: Oats Workshop 
  • Week 11: Conversations About Sugar
  • Week 12: Emotional Eating 
  • Week 13: Exercise in Recovery 
  • Week 14: Whole Grains and the Mediterranean Diet 
  • Week 15: Artificial Sweeteners 
  • Week 16: Salad Dressing Workshop 
  • Week 17: Fads and Myths 
  • Week 18: Guess that Plant 
  • Week 19: Binge Eating Solutions 
  • Week 20: Body Image and Disordered Eating 
  • Week 21: Chocolate Bites Workshop 
  • Week 22: So Many Different Approaches 
  • Week 23: Mindful Eating 
  • Week 24: Food Safety 
  • Week 25: Stress and Inflammation
  • Week 26: Cooking in Recovery

The cost of the curriculum is $695 and as a limited-time bonus includes a 30-minute consulting session with David Wiss MS RDN within 3 months of purchase. David will also send you his range of academic publications related to nutrition, substance use disorders, and eating disorders. You can use the 30-minute session either to seek clarification on the curriculum, to dive deeper into the research and learn more about the link between nutrition and mental health, or to pick David’s brain about anything. Lastly, those who purchase the curriculum will be added to a special mailing list where we will eventually form a group of nutritionists who work in addiction treatment centers sharing ideas, challenges, and victories. The goal is to one day have a recognized certification, and those who get in now will likely end up as the original leaders. Let’s join forces! 

Questions? Email davidawiss@nutritioninrecovery.com

Ready to make a payment? Use credit card HERE. 

Please make sure to include the proper email address for correspondence. You will be asked to sign a non-disclosure before receiving the Nutrition in Recovery curriculum. 

 

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A New Look at Food Issues- Podcast with Dr. Adam Silberstein

Dr. Adam Silberstein is a real hero. He has a serenity that is so attractive and for this reason has been an in-demand psychologist. David and Adam have had the privilege of working together over the years. This “A New Look at Food Issues” podcast was a chance for them to talk in-depth about food addiction and all of the controversies surrounding it. David discusses contemporary food issues from a personal as well as from a public health perspective. Specifically, David talks about stigma associated with addictions and obesity, and potential policy implications of the food addiction construct. Click below to listen to the “A New Look at Food Issues” 58-minute podcast!

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Circadian Rhythms & Mental Health Video

David Wiss MS RDN founder of Nutrition in Recovery walks you through some of the latest research on circadian rhythms linked to mental health. Key take-away points:

  • Both sleep and nutrition are part of circadian rhythms
  • Circadian rhythms are easily disrupted by binge eating and substance use
  • Associations between circadian rhythms and health are mediated by hormones and more recently the gut microbiome
  • Novel treatments for behavioral health disorders have begun looking into the circadian clock
  • Changing health behaviors can reverse circadian disruption over time
  • “When” you eat is often just as important as “what” you eat 
4:14

Nutrition in Recovery is a group practice of Registered Dietitian Nutritionists and other health professionals who specialize in the treatment of addictions, eating disorders, body image, mental health, as well as general wellness.

We send out a monthly Newsletter summarizing the latest research linking nutrition and mental health. Each newsletter will include a short video with some helpful hints and actions you can implement to improve mental, spiritual, and physical wellbeing for yourself and for your clients. You will be among the first to hear the findings and insights from cutting-edge data, and we are providing references so you can do your own research if interested.

View previous video on Nutrition During Childhood

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Biopsychosocial Opioid Video 6:42

 The opioid crisis has reached epidemic proportions in the United States with rising overdose death rates. Identifying the underlying factors that contribute to addiction vulnerability may lead to more effective prevention strategies. Supply side environmental factors are amajor contributing component. Psychosocial factors such as stress, trauma, and adverse childhood experiences have been linked to emotional pain leading to self-medication. Genetic and epigenetic factors associated with brain reward pathways and impulsivity are known predictors of addiction vulnerability. This review attempts to present a biopsychosocial approach that connects various social and biological theories related to the addiction crisis. The emerging role of nutrition therapy with an emphasis on gastrointestinal health in the treatment of opioid use disorder is presented. The biopsychosocial model integrates concepts from several disciplines, emphasizing multicausality rather than a reductionist approach. Potential solutions at multiple levels are presented, considering individual as well as population health. This single cohesive framework is based on the interdependency of the entire system, identifying risk and protective factors that may influence substance-seeking behavior. Nutrition should be included as one facet of a multidisciplinary approach toward improved recovery outcomes. Cross-disciplinary collaborative efforts, new ideas, and fiscal resources will be critical to address the epidemic.

Read more and get access to the article HERE

6:42
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